32nd Singapore Physics Olympiad 2019 (Experimental Round)

The experimental round for the 32nd Singapore Physics Olympiad (SPhO) will be held on 14 Nov 2019, at the National University of Singapore (NUS). Students who have been informed by their schools should take note of the instructions below, and arrive at the timing appropriate for their shift.
Details

  • Date: 14 Nov 2019 (Thursday)
  • Time: Reporting and dismissal time depends on shift, as shown below
    • Shift 1: 12.30pm – 3.30pm
    • Shift 2: 2.30pm – 5.30pm
  • Venue: Year 2 Physics Lab (Report to the Holding Room), Blk S12, Level 4, Room 1, NUS Science Faculty [map]
  • Note: Actual duration of examination is two hours.

Attire

  • School uniform

Materials

  • Identity Card or Student Pass
  • Pens, pencils, rulers, staplers, and other stationery (including flexible curve ruler to plot non-linear graphs)
  • Calculator (graphing calculators are not allowed, only scientific calculators are acceptable)

The syllabus for the competition is the same as for the International Physics Olympiad (IPhO). The syllabus can be downloaded here. Good luck and have fun with physics!
Instructions for actual day

  1. Be punctual!
  2. Staple all your answer scripts together (or as otherwise instructed on the actual day). Make sure you have your participant code written on every sheet you hand in.

32nd Singapore Physics Olympiad 2019

The theoretical round for the 32nd Singapore Physics Olympiad (SPhO) will be held on 19th October 2019, at the National Institute of Education (NIE). Students who have been nominated by their schools should take note of the instructions below.

Spacetime Coordinates

  • Date and Time: 19th October 2019 (Saturday), 0945-1615 hours
  • Venue: NIE, Blocks 5, 6 & 7
    • Meet outside Lecture Theatre 1, NIE-6-01-LT1.
    • Students will then be split to:
      • Lecture Theatre 2, NIE-7-01-LT2 (index 001-092)
      • Lecture Theatre 12, NIE-5-01-LT12 (index 093-183)
    • Click for general directions
      • If taking bus 199, alight at Car Park 7 and walk towards Block 7 (Science) at Level B3. Take the lift or walk up to Level 1 and follow the signs to LT1.
      • If taking bus 179, cross the road using the overhead bridge, to arrive at Block 1 (Administration) Level 1. Follow the signs to LT1.

Attire

  • School uniform

Materials

  • Identity Card or Student Pass
  • Pens, pencils, rulers, staplers, and other stationery
  • Calculator (graphing calculators are not allowed, only scientific calculators are acceptable)

Syllabus

The syllabus for the competition is the same as for the International Physics Olympiad (IPhO). The syllabus can be downloaded as a PDF from here. Good luck and have fun with physics!

Instructions for actual day

  1. Be punctual!
  2. Paper 1: two hours (before lunch). Paper 2: two hours (after lunch).
  3. Check that your particulars on the attendance list are correct (especially your name, as these will be used to prepare certificates) and sign on the attendance sheet.
  4. Staple all your answer scripts together (or as otherwise instructed on the actual day). Make sure you have your index number written on every sheet you hand in.
  5. About 50 students will be selected for the experimental round in the afternoon on 14 Nov 2019 (Thursday) — these students will be notified through their school teachers.

31st Singapore Physics Olympiad 2018 (Experimental Round)

The experimental round for the 31st Singapore Physics Olympiad (SPhO) will be held on 20 Nov 2018, at the National University of Singapore (NUS). Students who have been informed by their schools should take note of the instructions below, and arrive at the timing appropriate for their shift.

Details

  • Date: 20 Nov 2018 (Tuesday)
  • Time: Reporting and dismissal time depends on shift, as shown below
    • Shift 1: 12.30pm – 3.30pm
    • Shift 2: 2.30pm – 5.30pm
  • Venue: Physics Lab (Holding Room), Blk S12, Level 4, NUS Science Faculty [map]
  • Note: Actual duration of examination is two hours.

Attire

  • School uniform

Materials

  • Identity Card or Student Pass
  • Pens, pencils, rulers, staplers, and other stationery (including flexible curve ruler to plot non-linear graphs)
  • Calculator (graphing calculators are not allowed, only scientific calculators are acceptable)

The syllabus for the competition is the same as for the International Physics Olympiad (IPhO). The syllabus can be downloaded here. Good luck and have fun with physics!

Instructions for actual day

  1. Be punctual!
  2. Staple all your answer scripts together (or as otherwise instructed on the actual day). Make sure you have your participant code written on every sheet you hand in.

31st Singapore Physics Olympiad 2018

The theoretical round for the 31st Singapore Physics Olympiad (SPhO) will be held on 20th October 2018, at the National Institute of Education (NIE). Students who have been nominated by their schools should take note of the instructions below.

Details

  • Date and Time: 20th October 2018 (Saturday), 0945-1615 hours
  • Venue: NIE, Blocks 7 & 7A, various venues as advised by teachers
    • Biology Education Lab, NIE7-02-04
    • Life Sciences Lab 2, NIE7A-01-07
    • Physics Education Labs 1&2, NIE7-B1-32A&B
    • Science Education Lab, NIE7-02-01
  • Click for general directions
    • If taking bus 199, alight at Car Park 7 and walk towards Block 7 (Science) and Block 7A. The lifts start at Level B3.
    • If taking bus 179, from the overhead bridge, arrive between Block 1 (Administration) and Block 2 (Education) at Level 1. Block 7 is just next to Block 1 and opposite Block 2.

Attire

  • School uniform

Materials

  • Identity Card or Student Pass
  • Pens, pencils, rulers, staplers, and other stationery
  • Calculator (graphing calculators are not allowed, only scientific calculators are acceptable)

The syllabus for the competition is the same as for the International Physics Olympiad (IPhO). The syllabus can be downloaded as a PDF from here. Good luck and have fun with physics!

Instructions for actual day

  1. Be punctual!
  2. Paper 1: two hours (before lunch). Paper 2: two hours (after lunch).
  3. Check that your particulars on the attendance list are correct (especially your name, as these will be used to prepare certificates) and sign on the attendance sheet.
  4. Staple all your answer scripts together (or as otherwise instructed on the actual day). Make sure you have your participant code written on every sheet you hand in.
  5. About 50 students will be selected for the experimental round on 20 Nov 2018 (Tuesday) — these students will be notified through their school teachers.

Physics Olympiad Awards Ceremony 2018

[Guest post by Eliana Davita, edited by Zhiming Darren Tan]

On the 9th of March 2018, a group of intelligent, passionate young students, bursting with energy and potential, gathered in the lecture theatre of the NTU School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences for the annual Physics Olympiad Awards Ceremony.

The winning students were awarded with well-deserved medals, certificates and interesting physics books as the special awards. Amongst the titles was a dynamic duo; Surely You’re Joking, Mr Feynman! as well as What Do You Care What Other People Think? by the wonderfully weird and brilliant physicist Richard Feynman. There was also A Brief History of Time by Professor Stephen Hawking, who recently passed away.

However, the special awards that pleasantly surprised the national team were the classy red ties!

with-ties
Our prizes got our tongues tied! (Photo by Terence Chiew)

The Highly Impactful Keynote Speech

Our keynote speaker this year, Emeritus Professor Bernard Tan, opened with a powerful speech on science, technology and careers in the scientific or technological fields.

Thinking of a Career in Research?

Prof Tan mentioned that one of the most important qualities that a researcher must have is passion for their work. There needs to be passion in order to enjoy having to devote lots of time and effort into the work.

He also said that most of the researchers he knows are endearingly eccentric!

Prof Tan spent some time discussing other possible career options that might interest students, and have the potential of making an impact in society. The study of physics provides a rigorous preparation of the mind, and the knowledge and skills gained from that study can be flexibly applied to many diverse fields.

Scientific/Technological Advancements and its History

Prof Tan shared that he was fascinated with the scientific and technological advancements that occurred during World War II, the more he delved into history. From computers and radar to the Manhattan Project that developed the atomic bomb, no one can deny that the war revolutionised engineering and technology. Unfortunately, this also brought tremendous horrors. In the words of Robert Oppenheimer, “In some sort of crude sense which no vulgarity, no humour, no overstatement can quite extinguish, the physicists have known sin.”

Of course, technological advancements have also brought about a vast amount of good. Prof Tan looked back on key technological breakthroughs in the 18th and 19th centuries, from both East and West, and traced the progress of science in tandem with technology. He spoke for example on musical scales from ancient China, and on steam engines, a nifty invention that made transportation much faster.

The text of his prepared speech can be found here.

You’ve Heard of Comic-Con. Now Get Ready for…

Ever wondered what a Physics-Con panel was like? The panel consisted of Prof Tan, Mr Eugene Seo, Associate Professor Ng Hui Khoon, Associate Professor Rajdeep Singh Rawat, Dr Nidhi Sharma, Mr Fu Wei, Associate Professor Kwek Leong Chuan, and Dr He Ruimin.

Moderated by Prof Rawat, the eight brilliant panellists were there to share and discuss their ideas with audience. The topic of discussion centrifuged around the promises and perils of physics in the future.

panel
Dr He sharing his thoughts on the future of physics (Photo by Nadya Goh)

A lot of important information was shared during this session as it really told us what we should look forward to and be careful of with regards to physics in society. For example, there was a debate on nuclear energy and climate change, and the impact of rising sea levels. The panellists warned how global warming will change the conditions we live in, and encouraged us to find green solutions to the problem of our massive carbon footprint on the Earth.

The panellists agreed that a good grounding in physics would provide students with a strong foundation to meet the many challenges facing the world. They shared engaging anecdotes of the diversity of careers open to those with a solid physics background.

In addition, there was also the discussion about encouraging more women to pursue careers in the STEM fields. The panellists opined that with proper encouragement, more women will be attracted to STEM-related careers and inspired to put in the hard work and to take on such challenges.

Rawat
“There are no perils in physics!” exclaims Prof Rawat (Photo by Terence Chiew)

In the end, the audience was abuzz, the promising young minds full of hope and wonder for the future of science, society and mankind. The dialogue ended with a reflection that at the heart of the matter, curiosity and child-like wonder drive exploration and interest in nature.

Here’s to grooming generations of avid scientists who strive to make the world a better place using their magic wands of physics!

question
A future researcher from ACSI! (Photo by Terence Chiew)

Acknowledgements

Huge thanks go out to Associate Professor Cesare Soci and Professor Christian Kurtsiefer for integrating this awards ceremony as part of the 2018 IPS Meeting, and to Ms Sruthi Varier for coordinating logistics for the session. Thanks also to Dr Lim Kim Yong for his assistance in organising the event.

This session would also not have been possible without the services of Mr Vincent Ribli as emcee, Ms Hillary Chan at the awards table, and Ms Nadya Goh as photographer. Thanks to Mrs Fabiola Soong for arranging their help. Mr Terence Chiew also contributed photos (link).

Last but not least, thanks to all the speakers who also helped to give out the prizes! They were also joined by Prof Kurtsiefer and Dr Chen Zilong.

The Singapore Physics Olympiad and the Singapore Junior Physics Olympiad are organised by the Institute of Physics Singapore (IPS), with support from the Ministry of Education and Micron.

30th Singapore Physics Olympiad 2017 (Experimental Round)

The experimental round for the 30th Singapore Physics Olympiad (SPhO) will be held on 23 Nov 2017, at the National University of Singapore (NUS). Students who have been informed by their schools should take note of the instructions below, and arrive at the timing appropriate for their shift.

Details

  • Date: 23 Nov 2017 (Thursday)
  • Time: Reporting and dismissal time depends on shift, as shown below
    • Shift 1: 12.30pm – 3.00pm
    • Shift 2: 2.30pm – 5.00pm
  • Venue: Physics E Lab (Holding Room), Blk S11, #03–01, NUS Science Faculty [map]
  • Note: Actual duration of examination is two hours.

Attire

  • School uniform

Materials

  • Identity Card or Student Pass
  • Pens, pencils, rulers, staplers, and other stationery (including flexible curve ruler to plot non-linear graphs)
  • Calculator (graphing calculators are not allowed, only scientific calculators are acceptable)

The syllabus for the competition is the same as for the International Physics Olympiad (IPhO). The syllabus can be downloaded here. Good luck and have fun with physics!

Instructions for actual day

  1. Be punctual!
  2. Staple all your answer scripts together (or as otherwise instructed on the actual day). Make sure you have your participant code written on every sheet you hand in.

30th Singapore Physics Olympiad 2017

The theoretical round for the 30th Singapore Physics Olympiad (SPhO) will be held on 21st October 2017, at the National University of Singapore (NUS). Students who have been nominated by their schools should take note of the instructions below.

Details

  • Date and Time: 21st October 2017 (Saturday), 0900-1300 hours
  • Venue: NUS, LT 27 (Science Faculty) [map]

Attire

  • School uniform

Materials

  • Identity Card or Student Pass
  • Pens, pencils, rulers, staplers, and other stationery
  • Calculator (graphing calculators are not allowed, only scientific calculators are acceptable)

The syllabus for the competition is the same as for the International Physics Olympiad (IPhO). The syllabus can be downloaded here. Good luck and have fun with physics!

Instructions for actual day

  1. Be punctual!
  2. Check that your particulars on the attendance list are correct (especially your name, as these will be used to prepare certificates) and sign on the attendance sheet.
  3. Staple all your answer scripts together (or as otherwise instructed on the actual day). Make sure you have your participant code written on every sheet you hand in.
  4. About 50 students will be selected for the experimental round on 23 Nov 2017 (Thursday), and these students will be notified through your school teachers.

Physics Olympiad Awards Ceremony in 2017

On 24 Feb 2017, as part of the programme for the annual meeting of the Institute of Physics Singapore (IPS), close to 100 students and guests gathered to celebrate a group of young, bright minds who have demonstrated strong promise in physics. This event was held at the lush campus of Yale-NUS College, in the Performance Hall, and a short video showcasing Yale-NUS was played. It was an enjoyable afternoon of recognition, reflection and networking.

Students were presented with their certificates and medals for their excellent performance at the 2016 Singapore Junior Physics Olympiad (SJPO) and Singapore Physics Olympiad (SPhO).  Continue reading “Physics Olympiad Awards Ceremony in 2017”

29th Singapore Physics Olympiad 2016 (Experimental Round)

The experimental round for the 29th Singapore Physics Olympiad (SPhO) will be held on 17 Nov 2016, at the National University of Singapore (NUS). Students who have been informed by their schools should take note of the instructions below, and arrive at the timing appropriate for their shift.

Details

  • Date: 17 Nov 2016 (Thursday)
  • Time: Reporting and dismissal time depends on shift, as shown below
    • Shift 1: 1.00pm – 3.30pm
    • Shift 2: 3.00pm – 5.30pm
  • Venue: Physics E Lab (Holding Room), Blk S11, #03–01, NUS Science Faculty [map]
  • Note: Actual duration of examination is two hours.

Attire

  • School uniform

Materials

  • Identity Card or Student Pass
  • Pens, pencils, rulers, staplers, and other stationery
  • Calculator (graphing calculators are not allowed, only scientific calculators are acceptable)

The syllabus for the competition is the same as for the International Physics Olympiad (IPhO). The syllabus can be downloaded here. Good luck and have fun with physics!

Instructions for actual day

  1. Be punctual!
  2. Staple all your answer scripts together (or as otherwise instructed on the actual day). Make sure you have your participant code written on every sheet you hand in.

29th Singapore Physics Olympiad 2016

The theoretical round for the 29th Singapore Physics Olympiad (SPhO) will be held on 22nd October 2016, at the National University of Singapore (NUS). Students who have been nominated by their schools should take note of the instructions below.

Details

  • Date and Time: 22nd October 2016 (Saturday), 0900-1300 hours
  • Venue: NUS, LT 27 (Science Faculty) [map]

Attire

  • School uniform

Materials

  • Identity Card or Student Pass
  • Pens, pencils, rulers, staplers, and other stationery
  • Calculator (graphing calculators are not allowed, only scientific calculators are acceptable)

The syllabus for the competition is the same as for the International Physics Olympiad (IPhO). The syllabus can be downloaded here. Good luck and have fun with physics!

Instructions for actual day

  1. Be punctual!
  2. Check that your particulars on the attendance list are correct (especially your name, as these will be used to prepare certificates) and sign on the attendance sheet.
  3. Staple all your answer scripts together (or as otherwise instructed on the actual day). Make sure you have your participant code written on every sheet you hand in.
  4. About 50 students will be selected for the experimental round on 17 Nov 2016 (Thursday), and these students will be notified through your school teachers.

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